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Do I qualify for NHS continuing healthcare funding?

In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, if you have a disability or complex medical problem, you might qualify for free NHS continuing healthcare.What is NHS continuing healthcare?If your primary need is a ‘health need’, the NHS is responsible for providing and funding all your needs, even if you’re

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Benefits to help with your disability or care needs

If you have care needs or a disability – or you’re caring for someone who does – there are benefits to help you manage with the extra costs. Some of these benefits aren’t affected by income or savings, and you might be able to keep them if you have to go into a care home.What’s in this guide What be

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Get financial advice on how to fund your long-term care

If you’re working out how to pay for long-term care – for yourself or a loved one – an impartial care fees adviser can offer unbiased expert advice. Find out more about what they can do for you, how they’re paid and how to choose one that’s right for you.What’s in this guideWhere to find a specialis

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Do I qualify for local council (local authority) funding for care costs?

If you need support with day-to-day tasks, or you need to move into a care home, your local council or trust might help with the costs. How much will depend on your care needs and what you can afford.What’s in this guideWhat care services do local councils provide?How to find out if you qualify for

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NHS-funded nursing care

This is when the NHS pays a care home a contribution towards your nursing care. You might qualify if you’re in a care home and receiving care from a registered nurse or doctor.What’s in this guideWhat is NHS-funded nursing care?Can I get NHS-funded nursing care?How does the NHS Nursing Care Contribu

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Means tests for help with care costs – how they work

Even if you’ve paid National Insurance contributions all your life, you might have to pay towards your long-term care. Find out how the costs are calculated and whether you’ll have to pay.What’s In this guideWorking out who is going to pay for long-term careHow does a means test workIf you’re a home

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How a local authority care needs assessment works

A care needs assessment from your local authority can be the first step towards getting the help and support you need with your everyday life. The aim is to work out how much help you need to enable you to live as independently as possible.What’s in this guideWhat is a care needs (or social care) as

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Claiming on insurance to help cover the costs of care

Don’t pay for care costs before seeing if you can claim on an existing insurance policy. If you’ve taken out health insurance before, it might be helpful now.Check for insurance policiesCase studyThink carefully. Check whether you, or someone you’re caring for, has any of the following:Life insuranc

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Using a home reversion plan to pay for your care

If you’re over 65, own your home and need to fund your long-term care, you might be considering a home reversion plan. Here’s how they work and some pros and cons to consider.What’s in this guideWhat is a home reversion plan?How do home reversion plans work?Key safeguardsWhat are the pros and cons o

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Using investment bonds to pay for your long-term care

Investment bonds aren’t considered the best option to pay for your long-term care. However, in some circumstances they can be helpful. Find out more about the pros and cons.What are investment bonds?For clarity, the investment bonds we’re talking about here are medium to long-term investments that a

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Immediate needs annuity

If you need a regular income now to pay for care at home or a care home, an immediate needs annuity (or immediate need care fee payment plan) could be worth looking at. The income from this type of annuity is tax free if it’s paid directly to the care provider.What’s in this guideWhat is an immediat

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Paying your own care costs but the money’s run out?

If the money you’ve been using to pay for your long-term care is running out, find out about other ways to fund your care and how to apply for it.What’s in this guideFirst steps – take stock of your situationAsk for a care needs assessmentCheck if you qualify for NHS continuing healthcareWill you be

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Downsizing your home to fund your long-term care

You need to find a way of self-financing your long-term care and you own a home that’s bigger than you need. Could the answer be simple?What’s in this guideCould downsizing be the answer? How does downsizing compare with other options?Other benefits of downsizingDo the sumsMake sure you get proper e

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Using an equity release scheme to fund your care

If you need to fund your long-term care and have already paid off, or nearly paid off, your mortgage, an equity release scheme is one option to consider. But, equity release isn’t for everyone, so use this guide to help you decide.What is equity release?Equity release is a way of benefiting from the